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 Research  

A human capital approach to the educational marginalisation of Indigenous Australians by Nicholas Biddle. The aim of this paper is to apply some of the insights of the human capital model to better understand the education outcomes of Indigenous Australians.

Australian Council for Education Research (ACER) - Contextual factors that influence the achievement of Australia's Indigenous students: Results from PISA 2000 - 2006.
Indigenous students are performing well below the Australian average in international tests. Student attitudes, behaviours and backgrounds could provide some of the keys to understanding this, according to a report based on findings from the OECD's Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), which is managed nationally by the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER).

Australian Council for Education Research (ACER) - Report on Government Services 2010 Indigenous Compendium.
Underpinning information: the Indigenous Compendium compiled by the Steering Committee for the Review of Government Service Provision summarises all Indigenous data contained in the Report on Government Services 2010, including Early Childhood education (p21), School Education (p44) and Vocational Education and Training (p93).

Australian Council for Education Research (ACER) - Supporting English Literacy and Numeracy Learning for Indigenous Students in the Early Years.

For many years, the improvement of educational outcomes for Australian Indigenous peoples has been an issue high on the political agenda. The emphasis on monitoring student educational outcomes Australia-wide through state-wide testing has generated a wealth of data which has enabled systems to monitor the extent of educational inequities experienced by Indigenous students. Despite some improvements over time, national schools statistics point to a continuing gap in the average English literacy and numeracy achievement of Indigenous students when compared with non-Indigenous students at Year 3.

A longitudinal study by the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) has been monitoring growth in the English literacy and numeracy achievement of a group of Indigenous students through the early years of primary school prior to Year 3. Qualitative data collected during these years provided an opportunity to explore the learning contexts experienced by the students and other factors associated with growth and achievement.

Australian Reconciliation Barometer: A Quick Guide
The Barometer is a national research study that looks at the relationship between Indigenous and other Australians. Designed to be repeated every two years, the Barometer explores how we see and feel about each other, and how perceptions affect progress towards reconciliation and closing the gaps.

This is the first time we have compared core attitudes and values of Indigenous Australians to those of other Australians. The Barometer is an indicator of how we see ourselves and where we aspire to be as Australians. This brochure highlights some key findings of the first biennial Australian Reconciliation Barometer, conducted for Reconciliation Australia by Auspoll and completed in September 2008.

To read the full Barometer and details of how the research was done go to www.reconciliation.org.au.

Centre for Aboriginal Policy and Research - Plugged in: Remote Australian Indigenous Youth and Digital Culture.
For most Indigenous people in central and northern Australia the encounter with the western world has been relatively recent. Yet even in the most remote Indigenous communities, global influences pervade everyday life and new forms of media and communications are reshaping youth culture. This paper draws on ethnographic case study data from research with Indigenous youth who are participating in non-formal community-based media and music production and digital community archiving projects in remote regions. For these young adults the generational shift has been rapid, as many of their elders once lived a pre-contact nomadic existence. Now they are firmly part of global youth culture, taking on the role of mediating between old cultural knowledge and new digital technologies. Such generationally differentiated arenas of social practice are also changing the ways in which youth in remote Indigenous Australia are using oral and written language.

Centre for Aboriginal Policy and Research - Generational change, learning and remote Australian Indigenous Youth
In remote Indigenous Australia the typical mainstream youth transition from school to employment does not match the reality of community life, where traditional cultural schemas underpin the practice of everyday life and the construction of social identity. Although the developmental trajectory of the current generation of Indigenous youth has diverged from cultural norms, the introduced western trajectory of institutional learning leading to labour market employment does not yet offer a substitute paradigm. I argue that if young people are to become competent, mature adults able to shape their own futures and the economic and social viability of their communities, then attention will need to be paid, not only to institutional education and training pathways, but also to other approaches to learning. Such alternate pathways can contribute to the formation of a positive sense of self, strong cultural identities and the learning and literacy skills needed to shape Indigenous futures. This paper uses research from remote central and northern Australia to explore community-based approaches to youth learning and cultural production.

Centre for Aboriginal Policy and Research - A human captial approach to the educational marginalisation of Indigenous Australians by Nicholas Biddle
Education is a key determinant at both a national and individual level for health, wellbeing and access to economic resources. What's more, education has intrinsic benefits for those who undertake it, as well as for those around them. The standard human capital model has been used by many to understand the education decisions that individuals make, as well as the consequences of these decisions for themselves and wider society. While the standard model may seem overly simple at first glance (individuals undertake education until the predicted benefits no longer outweigh the predicted costs), when the costs and benefits from education are expanded to include the social sphere, and when uncertainty about the future is taken into account, a number of insights emerge with respect to educational marginalisation. The aim of this paper is to apply some of the insights of the human capital model to better understand the education outcomes of Indigenous Australians. Regional and individual data from the census is interpreted alongside a selection of key articles and reports in order to help understand why it is that so few Indigenous people are undertaking formal education in Australia today.

Connecting Cultures, Review of Victorian Indigenous Education Strategies: Supporting Indigenous Students Through School - Professor Peter Buckskin PSM, FACE; Professor Paul Hughes AM, FACE; Professor Bob Teasdale; Mr John Gregory; Ms Colleen Clarke; Associate Professor Douglas L Morgan and Ms Jody St Clair

The review used key quantative and qualative indicators to assess the DEECD worksforce's overall efficiency and effectiveness in improving outcomes for Indigenous students. The objective of the review was to inform supportable and sustainable directions for improved future delivery, with particular regard to the terms of reference.

Do Indigenous Youth have a dream - Bob Beadman
A warts and all look at remote communities in the Northern Territory, and some ideas on correcting a deteriorating situation, so that kids might have a future.

Early Post-School Outcomes of Indigenous Young People: The Role of Literacy and Numeracy
The Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) allows us to assess the extent to which the gap in outcomes between young Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians is due to Indigenous disadvantage. Once the effect of background characteristics, and literacy and numeracy, has been removed, does the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous young people still remain? PowerPoint Presentation

Education is the key
An education future for Indigenous communities in the Northern Territory. Improving access and participation in high quality education must be a central element in strategies aimed at improving the lives and futures of Territorians.

The Greatest Injustice - Why we have failed to improve the health of Aboriginal people - Professor Fiona Stanley AC
The Abstract of Professor Fiona Stanley's 2008 Annual Hawke Lecture delivered at Adelaide Town Hall Thursday 6 November 2008.

How Young Indigenous People are Faring - Key Indicators 1996 - 2006
This report launched in April 2009 by Dusseldorp Skills Forum and Reconciliation Australia, gives detailed analysis of the post-school situation of Australia's Indigenous young people and raises many important questions for educators. 

Keeping Up - Strengthening transitions from education to work for Indigenous young people
This report launched in April 2009 by Dusseldorp Skills Forum and Reconciliation Australia draws on the key insights from the How young Indigenous people are faring paper. It maps the patterns of what is happening for Indigenous young people and identifies how improvements can be made.

Indigenous Education and Training, 2006 - National Report to Parliament
This is the sixth in a series of annual reports to Parliament on Indigenous education and training in Australia. Since 2001 these reports have provided evidence of only limited progress in the reduction of gaps in educational outcomes
between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. This report makes it patently clear that serious gaps remain in all education sectors and that only increased and sustained efforts will close them.


Inquiry into the Protection of Aboriginal Children from Sexual Abuse Report Released

The Inquiry was established in 2002 and was Co-Chaired by Ms Patricia Anderson and Rex Wild QC. The report found that Aboriginal children as young as three are falling victim to widespread sex abuse fuelled by alcohol, pornography and ignorance. The inquiry made 97 recommendations including a shake-up of the education system, support from government agencies and the tightening of pornography laws.

Indigenous Students and English Literacy - what every teacher needs to know
National report to Parliament on Indigenous Education and Training

The National Reports to Parliament on Indigenous Education and Training enables the Commonwealth Minister for Education, Science and Training to report to each House of Parliament according to Section 17A of the Indigenous Education (Targeted Assistance) Act 2000.

2004
2003 Part 1, 2003 Part 2, 2003 Appendices
2002
2001

The Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) allows us to  assess the extent to which the gap in outcomes between young Indigenous and  non-Indigenous Australians is due to Indigenous disadvantage. Once the effect  of background characteristics, and literacy and numeracy, has been removed, does the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous young people still remain?

Paper: http://avetra.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/40.00-Nhi-Nguyen.pdf

Powerpoint:  http://avetra.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/40.00-Nguyen.pdf

National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey
The 2002 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey (NATSISS) is a multi-dimensional social survey of Australia's Indigenous population. The survey enables analysis of the interrelationship of social circumstances and outcomes, including the exploration of multiple disadvantage that may be experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.

The 2002 NATSISS is a large and rich source of social data on Indigenous people aged 15 years or over.

Overcoming Indigenous Disadvantage: Key Indicators 2009
In April 2002, the Council of Australian Governments commissioned the Steering Committee to produce a regular report against key indicators of Indigenous disadvantage. This report has an important long-term objective. It is to inform Australian governments about whether policy programs and interventions are achieving positive outcomes for Indigenous people. This will help guide where further work is needed. The latest addition of the report, Overcoming Indigenous Disadvantage: Key Indicators 2009, was released on 2 July 2009. Previous editions were published in 2003, 2005 and 2007.

The Steering Committee has consulted widely with Indigenous organisations, governments and researchers in developing the report and the indicator framework on which it was based. The Steering Committee published consultation reports in 2003 and 2006. Click here to download a copy of the powerpoint presentation.

Click here to read a summary of the report prepared by Mike Winkler, Dare to Lead Communication Officer

NSW Review of Aboriginal Education
Stories of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal parents, students, workers and community members, of teachers, principals, academics, researchers and submission writers collected during the Review have created a small mountain of information.

School Entry Assessment of Indigenous Students for South Australian Independent Schools
Guidelines for School Entry Assessment of Indigenous Students. This paper has been developed to complement the School Entry Assessment Issues Papers that are included in the 'Literacy and Numeracy School Entry Assessment for
SA Independent Schools' folders published by the SA Independent Schools Targeted Programs Authority in 2001.

State of the World's Indigenous Peoples
The First UN report on the state of the world's Indigenous peoples cover Indigenous issues pertaining to health and well being, culture, the environment, contemporary education, health and human rights.

The Health and Welfare of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders Peoples, 2008
This publication is the sixth in the series of reports on the health and welfare of Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. By drawing on recent data available from a variety of sources, it aims to provide a comprehensive picture of the health and welfare of Australia's Indigenous population. It covers a range of topics regarded as important for improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.



 

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